The wharf borer (Narcerdes melanura), one of many beetle species in existence, is found across the globe. This beetle may look like a longhorn beetle due to its long feelers, but is in fact part of an entirely other beetle species. This beetle species originates from the Great Lakes in North America and has spread to many other regions.

The wharf borer has a 6 to 12mm length and a red-brown colour. The tips of its elytra are black and this beetle is able to fly. The larvae of this beetle species may reach 12 to 18mm lengths and have an off-white colour. They primarily live in partially decayed wood of deciduous and coniferous trees. Partially submersed poles are especially vulnerable for being entirely eaten.

These beetles, often found in homes and buildings in water-rich areas, appear between April and August and lay their eggs on wood. This often takes place under the house or building, as wood is not always removed when concrete is poured. Woodwork found inside houses may also be affected, but only in highly humid atmospheres. One vital requirement for the larvae is that the wood must be wet and affected by fungi, while it may not have rotten to a degree that the wood is already falling apart.

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